Job Ads Are A Valid Indicator Of Programming Language Acceptance

I found an article from a mystery blogger here called Job Ads Do Not Reflect Programming Language Popularity that covered my post on Scala, Groovy, Clojure, Jython, JRuby and Java: Jobs by Language. It’s well written and pretty fair and I think that anyone who found the my original article interesting should go over there and read it. That said, there are a few points that I’d like to expand on if you will indulge me.

1) The job percentage of 3.5% for Java is across ALL jobs on indeed.com not just IT related ones (there are 2x as many Java jobs as there are listings for accountants 🙂 ) which makes the 3.5% value quite respectable.

2) The stats do seem to imply that Scala and Groovy have far more momentum than Clojure. I know some real Clojure fans but compared to the relevant Scala and Groovy user groups they seem to be a little more active. Also, both Scala and Groovy have killer weapon in the Akka and Grails frameworks. I don’t know if the same can be said for Clojure (Noir?) and would be happy to be proven wrong. I don’t think that the importance of having these weapons can be underestimated. It gives both languages great leverage in getting in the door of businesses and once they are in the door then I would expect more general usage to follow.

In the original article I showed the graph below and mentioned that it was likely that Scala would overtake Jython and that in fact, Scala’s growth rate had overtaken Groovy’s (although with a caveat that it was only a few data points and so could be a ‘flash in the pan’).

Now this is the same graph 6 weeks later…

It looks like I was right on both predictions (cue outrageous smugness!) but they both seemed reasonably obvious. The one thing I did not guess was the Groovy’s grow rate would have stalled like it has. I hope it’s only temporary.

The author goes on to give a very good time line of the development of a language but doesn’t mention that crossing the chasm is the hardest thing for any language and that’s where both Scala and Clojure are right now.

3) I completely agree with the average Java developer caring less for programming since it is currently the default language of the majority. By this fact you will find more close-to-the-mean programmers using it than any other language. Given the volume of jobs out there the stickiness of the jobs can’t be that different and because of this I think that job listings are a valid metric of the industry acceptance of a language. Even if they are only slightly indicative, you would have to show that jobs in other languages are 60x stickier to be on a par with Java or that Clojure jobs are 6x stickier than Scala jobs.

4) I hope that I never gave the impression that if you are a Java developer that you shouldn’t bother to learn new JVM languages. I completely agree with my mystery friend that knowing new languages makes you more employable. As someone deeply involved in the recruitment process at my current employer I can personally attest to this. I would go as far as to suggest that knowing more languages makes you a better programmer since it exposes you to more ways of doing the same thing. More tools in your toolbox gives you a better chance of picking the right one and using it correctly.

As for whether my final paragraph was too strong, I can only say that I call ’em as I see ’em. Yes I am a bigger fan of Scala and Groovy than I am of Clojure but please don’t take this as evidence that I am somehow against Clojure. Clojure is a beautiful language but it suffers from the fact that it lacks the aforementioned ‘weapon’ and is just so different from Java that companies will shy away from it worried about how long it will take them to spin up their entire workforce, not just their elite teams.

Maybe I can phrase it differently this time; it doesn’t matter whether you are a Java developer or not, the best thing you can do is to read “Seven Languages in Seven Weeks: A Pragmatic Guide to Learning Programming Languages” by Bruce Tate. Learning Ruby, Io, Prolog, Scala, Erlang, Clojure, Haskell will do great things for anyone’s understanding of programming languages.

 

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